Tribulations of the self as described in modernity and self identity by anthony giddens

Building upon the ideas set out in The Consequences of Modernity, Giddens argues that 'high' or 'late' modernity is a post traditional order characterised by a developed institutional reflexivity.

Tribulations of the self as described in modernity and self identity by anthony giddens

Stanford UniversityPress,pp. Everyone stillcontinues to live a local life, and the constraints of the bodyensure that all individuals, at every moment, are contextuallysituated in time and space. Yet the transformations of place, and theintrusion of distance into local activities, combined with thecentrality of mediated experience, radically change what 'the world'actually is.

This is so both on the level of the 'phenomenal world'of the individual and the general universe of social activity withinwhich collective social life is enacted.

Although everyone lives alocal life, phenomenal worlds for the most part are truly global. Characterising individuals' phenomenal worlds is difficult,certainly in the abstract. Every person reacts selectively to thediverse sources of direct and mediated experience which compose theUmwelt.

One thing we can say with some certainty is that invery few instances does the phenomenal world any longer correspond tothe habitual settings through which an individual physically moves. Localities are thoroughly penetrated by distanciated influences,whether this be regarded as a cause for concern or simply accepted asa routine part of social life.

All individuals actively, although byno means always in a conscious way, selectively incorporate manyelements of mediated experience into their day-to-day conduct.

Thisis never a random or a passive process, contrary to what the image ofthe collage effect might suggest. A newspaper, for example,presents a collage of information, as does, on a wider scale, thewhole bevy of newspapers which may be on sale in a particular area orcountry.

Yet each reader imposes his own order on this diversity, byselecting which newspaper to read--if any--and by making an activeselection of its contents. In some part the appropriation of mediated information followspre-established habits and obeys the principle of the avoidance ofcognitive dissonance.

That is to say, the plethora of availableinformation is reduced via routinised attitudes which exclude, orreinterpret, potentially disturbing knowledge.

People and ideas systems

From a negative pointof view, such closure might be regarded as prejudice, the refusalseriously to entertain views and ideas divergent from those anindividual already holds; yet, from another angle, avoidance ofdissonance forms part of the protective cocoon which helps maintainontological security.

For even the most prejudiced or narrow-mindedperson, the regularised contact with mediated information inherent inday-to-day life today is a positive appropriation: Obviouslythere are wide variations in terms of how open a given individual isto new forms of knowledge, and how far that person is able totolerate certain levels of dissonance.

But all phenomenal worlds areactive accomplishments, and all follow the same basic psychodynamics,from the most local of ways of life to the most cosmopolitan. We can analyse these most easily by understanding themas dilemmas which, on one level or another, have to be resolved inorder to preserve a coherent narrative of self-identity.

Unification versus fragmentation The first dilemma is that of unification versusfragmentation. Modernity fragments; it also unites. On thelevel of the individual right up to that of planetary systems as awhole, tendencies towards dispersal vie with those promotingintegration.

So far as the self is concerned, the problem ofunification concerns protecting and reconstructing the narrative ofself-identity in the face of the massive intensional and extensionalchanges which modernity sets into being. In most pre-modern contexts,the fragmentation of experience was not a prime source of anxiety.

Trust relations were localised and focused through personal ties,even if intimacy in the modern sense was generally lacking. In apost-traditional order, however, an indefinite range of possibilitiespresent themselves, not just in respect of options for behaviour, butin respect also of the 'openness of the world' to the individual.

Yet it is wrong to see the world 'out there' as intrinsicallyalienating and oppressive to the degree to which social systems areeither large in scale or spatially distant from the individual.

Suchphenomena may often be drawn on to supply unifying influences; theyare not just fragmenting in their impact on the self. Distant eventsmay become as familiar, or more so, than proximate influences, andintegrated into the frameworks of personal experience.

Situations 'athand' may in fact be more opaque than large-scale happeningsaffecting many millions of people. A personmay be on the telephone to someone twelve thousand miles away and forthe duration of the conversation be more closely bound up with theresponses of that distant individual than with others sitting in thesame room.

The appearance, personality and policies of a worldpolitical leader may be better known to a given individual than thoseof his next-door neighbour. A person may be more familiar with thedebate over global warming than with why the tap in the kitchenleaks. Nor are remote or large-scale phenomena necessarily factorsonly vaguely 'in the background' of an individual's psychologicalmake-up and identity.

A concern with global warming, for example,might form part of a distinctive lifestyle adopted by a person, evenif she is not an ecological activist.

Thus she might keep in closecontact with scientific debates and adjust various aspects of herlifestyle in relation to the practical measures they suggest.

Modernity and Self-Identity : Anthony Giddens :

Fragmentation clearly tends to be promoted by the influencesemphasised hy Berger and others: In many modern settings, individuals are caught up in avariety of differing encounters and milieux, each of which may callfor different forms of appropriate' behaviour.

Goffman is normallytaken to be the theorist par excellence of this phenomenon.'Living in the world': dilemmas of the self In conditions of late modernity, we live 'in the world' in adifferent sense from previous eras of history.

Everyone stillcontinues to live a local life, and the constraints of the bodyensure that all individuals, at every moment, are contextuallysituated in time and space.

by Anthony Giddens Modernity And Self-Identity: Self And Society In The Late Modern benjaminpohle.com - Are you searching for Modernity And Self-Identity: Self And Society In The Late Modern Age By. Building on the ideas set out in the author's The Consequences of Modernity, this book focuses on the self and the emergence of new mechanisms of self-identity that are shaped by—yet also shape—the institutions of modernity.

The author argues that the self is not a .

Tribulations of the self as described in modernity and self identity by anthony giddens

This item: Modernity and Self-Identity: Self and Society in the Late Modern Age by Anthony Giddens Paperback $ In Stock. Ships from and sold by benjaminpohle.coms: Acknowledgements Introduction 1. The contours of h | Anthony Giddens | | sci-napse Created with Sketch.

Modernity and Self-Identity: Self and Society in the Late Modern Age and existential anxiety 3.

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The trajectory of the self 4. Fate, risk, and security 5. The sequestration of experience 6. Tribulations of the self 7. The emergence of. People and ideas systems As outlined by Andrew Roberts of Middlesex University, London.

Introductory sketches of the ideas of theorists, linked to Andrew Roberts' book Social Science History and the Society and Science History benjaminpohle.comped from a course document "Outline of the theorists we could cover" (February ), the web .

Modernity and Self-Identity (ebook) by Anthony Giddens |